Globe Invited to Attend Firefighter Physiological Monitoring Technology Summit

Globe Invited to Attend Firefighter Physiological Monitoring Technology Summit

Globe has been invited to attend the Firefighter Physiological Monitoring Technology Summit being held March 28-30, 2018 in Washington, DC. The Summit is presented by the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation and Skidmore College’s SMARTER (Science, Medicine, Research, Technology for Emergency Responders) program and will present groundbreaking information on the emerging field of firefighter wearable technology. Three specific areas will be addressed: The use of wearable ECG technology to detect early signs of cardiac events following firefighting or training exercises; The use of algorithms to estimate core temperature to reduce the risk of heat related injuries and fatalities; The use of low cost, portable technology to monitor air contamination levels on the fireground and in structures post fire. Important information for the fire service will be disseminated through the marketing channels of the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation and the Skidmore College SMARTER program. The ultimate goal of the SMARTER study going on now through most of 2018 is to reduce firefighter injuries and fatalities through the appropriate implementation of technology. Firefighters in the study are wearing shirts designed by Globe that incorporate a physiologic status monitoring system developed by Zephyr. The firefighters wear the Globe shirts throughout their 24-hour shifts and physiologic data such as heart rate, estimated core body temperature, respiration rate, ECG, movement, and more are recorded via electronic modules that are snapped into the shirts. The data shows the impact of live field operations on their bodies. This research is being led by Skidmore College with collaborative support from University of California at Los Angeles, University of Illinois Fire Service Institute, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental...
You pull up to a call in winter and what do you encounter? Water and ICE!

You pull up to a call in winter and what do you encounter? Water and ICE!

By Bill Ells, Vibram USA, Inc. How do you then minimize the risk of slips and falls in winter conditions? Globe fire boots with Vibram Arctic Grip Pro Technology provide a level of traction on wet ice not seen before. In 2014, Vibram challenged its chemists, product engineers, and team of testers to develop a technology that changed the standard in winter traction and one of the most treacherous surfaces known to man – WET ICE. Added to the challenge, was to do it without the use of metal spikes or the need to stop and fix a separate component, or overshoe, to footwear. After years of development, countless trials, and a few failures, success was achieved in the development of Vibram Arctic Grip and Arctic Grip Pro – the most advanced cold weather gripping system Vibram has ever created. Globe, a longtime supporter of the Vibram brand, immediately took interest in this revolutionary product. After all, the goal of both Vibram and Globe is to provide the first responder with the highest level of performance available. Vibram Arctic Grip Pro is a combination of the highest performing rubber outsole compound, combined with an advanced filler system that provides unparalleled traction on wet ice, along with Vibram durability. The areas within the sole (see image at right) with yellow fleck in the lug, contain the advanced filler system that runs throughout the full thickness of the material. Vibram Arctic Grip and Vibram Arctic Grip Pro (Pro is the industrial version that meets NFPA requirements) have been tested in some of the most extreme environments. Vibram Arctic Grip Pro is...
Globe is Now Part of MSA | Still Globe, Only Better

Globe is Now Part of MSA | Still Globe, Only Better

By Rob Freese, Sr. Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Globe Manufacturing Company, now part of MSA It’s been all over Wall Street and Main Street, within the fire service and outside, and all around the world that Globe’s fourth generation owners have sold the business to MSA Safety Incorporated. It’s true. Globe protective clothing manufacturing, boot manufacturing, and cleaning and repair businesses are now part of MSA. What brought us together? If you know me, you’ve probably heard me say in the past that Globe is more than a business. It is a calling. If so, maybe you were a little surprised to find out that this family business now has new owners – a publicly traded company, not a fifth generation of the Freese family. So let me tell you a little about how we came to join forces with the world’s leader in safety. Several years ago − when really solidifying plans for the future of our great organization − we found ourselves without fifth generation family members in the wings ready to lead the business into the future. So we engaged in a multi-year process to identify potential new ownership that would be good stewards of what my family has created over four generations and 130 years. I can tell you that it wasn’t about auctioning off the business to the highest bidder. It was, in fact, about finding a home that reflected our core values. A home that would ensure a bright future for the business, our employees, our communities, our dealers, and most importantly for the firefighters and first responders who rely on...
3 Ways Boots Made in the USA Benefit You

3 Ways Boots Made in the USA Benefit You

At Globe, we believe that “Made in the USA” means something. When you buy our athletic construction fire boots made in Maine, you’re helping to protect and preserve American jobs – not just for the workers in our boot factory, but beyond. We’ve made significant investments in the capacity to manufacture American-made footwear through lean manufacturing and producing components that were previously only available from offshore suppliers. Those investments are in new technologies, equipment, research and development, processes, and people. We are committed to source all boot components in the USA, a challenge in an industry that has essentially moved to Asia. If we cannot find a domestic source for a part, we learn how to make it ourselves. Globe worked with the University of Maine’s Advanced Manufacturing Center over two years, with a pair of seed grants from the Maine Technology Institute (MTI), to develop a process, then a machine, to make toe caps for our boots. That work was brought back to the USA from China. In a second MTI-funded project, in partnership with another Maine manufacturer and the University of Maine, we determined how to build a flexible fabric-based puncture-resistant barrier for all of our boots, replacing two components that were made in Asia. From there, we moved the sources of outer soles and footbeds from China to the USA. These changes have provided Globe with a flexible supply chain that can respond quickly to changes in market demand and design. They also have the benefit of keeping dollars circulating in the American economy. But what does all of this mean to you, the firefighter? There...
Globe to Present at WEAR 2017 and Techtextil North America | Wearable Technology for First Responders

Globe to Present at WEAR 2017 and Techtextil North America | Wearable Technology for First Responders

The WEAR Conference is the preeminent wearable technology, smart textiles, material innovation, and consumer experience conference. At the upcoming event to be held June 12-14 in San Francisco, Mark Mordecai, our Director of Business Development, will present the Globe Wearable Advanced Sensor Platform – WASP™ – the world’s only commercial physiological monitoring and location tracking system dedicated to serving the critical needs of public safety personnel. As project lead since inception, he will discuss the challenges and successes surrounding this effort and speak to the gaps that remain in order for it to achieve its full potential for users and to become a viable business. The leading cause of line of duty deaths for firefighters is cardiac events. Challenging environmental factors and a host of personal factors combine in complex ways, particularly during and after fire suppression, to trigger physiological responses that all too often lead to death or disability. And the biggest fear of firefighters is not fighting the fire; it’s being unable to locate and rescue a downed team member. The WASP™ system tracks heart rate, heart rate variability, estimated core body temperature, respiration rate, activity levels, posture, and other physiological factors, as well as 3D location inside a building. WEAR 2017 will specifically focus on the future of smart fabrics and wearable technology, with tours, workshops, and presentations about wearable apps, sustainability innovation, collaboration within the industry, fashion and technology, and the future of healthcare and connected medical devices. It is expected to draw over 300 attendees from adidas, IBM, Google, Lululemon, Nike, Amazon, and more. Mark is also scheduled to present the Globe WASP™ system...
Boston Fire Department’s Bunker Gear Particulate Testing

Boston Fire Department’s Bunker Gear Particulate Testing

By Edward McCarthy, Logistics Manager, Boston Fire Department The Boston Fire Department (BFD) has a long and proud history, one that we take great pride in. Boston has been at the forefront of the fire industry for well over 300 years. It was the first fire department in North America, tracing its lineage back to 1678. In 1851, the BFD was the first department in the world to protect the city through the use of a public telegraph fire alarm system, a system still in operation today. The BFD operated the first fire engine, a hand engine, put into service in 1678. It was one of the first to purchase a steam engine, one of the first with a fire boat, one of the first to use radio for communication. We pushed for, helped develop, and were the first department in the country to use modern breathing apparatus. While we are proud of our past, we must also be focused on the future, and we must always strive to continually improve. The Cancer Threat Recently the fire service, and Boston in particular, has been struggling with the reality of an ever-increasing number of firefighters being affected by cancer. While the reasons for this are hotly debated, the effect has been devastating. In Boston, 1 in 6 members will develop cancer and some will never recover. We have taken many steps to reduce exposure to toxic substances, increased physical fitness programs, shown members the benefits of healthy diets, and created a host of post incident decontamination processes. However, we felt that there was more that could be done. One area...