Are you training to survive? Enhancing firefighter safety through tactical resiliency.

Are you training to survive? Enhancing firefighter safety through tactical resiliency.

By Ric Jorge, Tactical Resiliency Training, LLC – In the fire service, we practice the Denver drill, the Pittsburgh drill, the Nance drill, entanglement, wall breech, low profile, and an assortment of packaging techniques. We train in firefighter survival techniques in the hopes of making firefighters more prepared to respond to our own emergency if/when the need arises. NIOSH reviews of LODDs call for firefighters to become better adapted under stressful situations. To perform under these situations, and retain proper decision-making ability, requires more than just physical training. It requires layers of understanding. A few examples of this layering of understanding involve cognition, conditioning of physical/emotional/mental arousal levels, and how to prepare people to deal with their sympathetic nervous system response. The sympathetic nervous system is the part of the nervous system that accelerates heart rate, constricts blood vessels, and raises blood pressure – all potentially critical factors in firefighter safety. It is impossible to get our people from good to high-speed low drag without pushing them physically, and mentally. But how do you know when you’re pushing too hard? How do you know when you’re not pushing hard enough? At Tactical Resiliency Training (TRT), we specialize in the development of training instructors to get the most out of their training and their people. One of the tools we utilize to understand how the sympathetic nervous system affects performance under stressful and extreme situations is the Wearable Advanced Sensor Platform (WASP) system from Globe Manufacturing Company. Using a small electronic module attached to a base layer shirt, WASP monitors the firefighters’ vital signs that indicate maximum heart rate productivity...
How to photograph firefighter PPE

How to photograph firefighter PPE

By Jeffrey O. and Grace G. Stull – When investigating a firefighter injury or death, documenting the condition of the PPE is critical; that includes a visual record When firefighters are injured or killed their protective clothing is often inspected as part of the investigation. These inspections can provide useful information for how the clothing might have been worn as well as provide some insight as to the fireground exposure the firefighter encountered. Therefore, undertaking a methodical and comprehensive examination of the clothing and equipment is an important process of any investigation and the photographs that are taken form a significant portion of its documentation. There are procedures for clothing items covered by NFPA 1971 that are especially useful in fully photo-documenting a clothing inspection. Additional procedures apply to the inspection of self-contained breathing apparatus and PASS device. These items can be subjected to detailed assessment through the NIOSH Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation Program. General information on the turnout clothing inspection process is provided in the chapter on inspection in NFPA 1851, Standard on Selection, Care, and Maintenance of Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting. However, no guidance is given for what images to capture as part of an investigation. For those not wanting to conduct their own investigation, many PPE manufacturers have both the capabilities and willingness to do it. Solid background For those departments examining protective clothing worn by a firefighter following a serious injury or fatality, it is important to have a suitable inspection area and the right equipment. While it is sometimes convenient to have clothing laid out on a table,...