New download | SMARTER: Advancing Health-Related Technology

New download | SMARTER: Advancing Health-Related Technology

In 2016, the Department of Homeland Security Assistance to Firefighting Grant (AFG) funded a program titled “Science, Medicine, And Research & Technology for the Emergency Responders (SMARTER)” to explore the potential use of technology to address some of the most pressing health concerns in the fire service. The SMARTER team was led by researchers at Skidmore College’s First Responder Health and Safety Laboratory, and included leading scientists, fire service professionals, and gear manufacturers. The collaborative teams were designed to include expertise from science, technology and industry, and to be guided by a deep understanding of the fire service culture and the needs of firefighters. Some technologies explored were already on the market but needed to be adapted for potential use in the fire service, while other technologies still needed to be developed. Specific goals of the project were to study the feasibility of specific technologies and to develop/advance technology in targeted areas. Specifically, SMARTER focused on: Electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring for detection of arrhythmias and ischemic changes Improving and extending a heat stress algorithm to accurately assess core body temperature Developing a low-cost, portable sensor to monitor particulate matter Exploring the use of physiological status monitoring in a fire department To learn more from the SMARTER project researchers about work done on each of the targeted areas, download our Firehouse Supplement. SMARTER Project partners include Skidmore College; National Fallen Firefighters Foundation; Fire Protection Research Foundation; Globe by MSA; Hanover Park, IL, Fire Department; Houston Fire Department; International Association of Fire Fighters; New York State Office of Fire Prevention and Control; UCLA−The Ozcan Research Group; University of Illinois Fire Service Institute;...
Globe Invited to Attend Firefighter Physiological Monitoring Technology Summit

Globe Invited to Attend Firefighter Physiological Monitoring Technology Summit

Globe has been invited to attend the Firefighter Physiological Monitoring Technology Summit being held March 28-30, 2018 in Washington, DC. The Summit is presented by the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation and Skidmore College’s SMARTER (Science, Medicine, Research, Technology for Emergency Responders) program and will present groundbreaking information on the emerging field of firefighter wearable technology. Three specific areas will be addressed: The use of wearable ECG technology to detect early signs of cardiac events following firefighting or training exercises; The use of algorithms to estimate core temperature to reduce the risk of heat related injuries and fatalities; The use of low cost, portable technology to monitor air contamination levels on the fireground and in structures post fire. Important information for the fire service will be disseminated through the marketing channels of the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation and the Skidmore College SMARTER program. The ultimate goal of the SMARTER study going on now through most of 2018 is to reduce firefighter injuries and fatalities through the appropriate implementation of technology. Firefighters in the study are wearing shirts designed by Globe that incorporate a physiologic status monitoring system developed by Zephyr. The firefighters wear the Globe shirts throughout their 24-hour shifts and physiologic data such as heart rate, estimated core body temperature, respiration rate, ECG, movement, and more are recorded via electronic modules that are snapped into the shirts. The data shows the impact of live field operations on their bodies. This research is being led by Skidmore College with collaborative support from University of California at Los Angeles, University of Illinois Fire Service Institute, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental...
SMARTER Project Update: Data Collection and Analysis

SMARTER Project Update: Data Collection and Analysis

By Craig A. Haigh, MS, EFO, NRP; Fire Chief, Hanover Park Fire Department; Research Partner, SMARTER Project The deployment of physiologic data as part of the SMARTER project is well underway.  Data collection is progressing and the team is beginning the arduous task of analyzing the vast amount of information collected on each firefighter. The SMARTER (Science, Medicine, Research, Technology for Emergency Responders) research project is focused on advancing technology to improve health and safety in the fire service. SMARTER aims to employ scientific advances, medical knowledge, research findings, and technological solutions to reduce firefighter injuries and fatalities. The research is supported by the Assistance to Firefighters Grant funding and is being led by Skidmore College with collaborative support from University of California at Los Angeles, University of Illinois Fire Service Institute, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Fire Protection Research Foundation, National Fallen Firefighters Foundation, Hanover Park (Illinois) Fire Department, Globe Manufacturing Company, Zephyr Medtronic, International Association of Firefighters, and others. Data Collection and Analysis All Hanover Park firefighters are wearing Globe’s WASP™ wearable technology throughout their work shift to monitor and track physiologic data such as heart rate, estimated core body temperature, respiration rate, ECG, and movement. This data is then downloaded and transmitted electronically to Skidmore College – First Responder Health and Safety Laboratory where the analysis process begins. Individual files from firefighters are compared against emergency response reports, trainings, daily physical fitness activities and other events to determine how the firefighters physiologically responded to the various incidents and events. The process to manage individual physiologic data files and link the data to the physical...
Globe to Present at WEAR 2017 and Techtextil North America | Wearable Technology for First Responders

Globe to Present at WEAR 2017 and Techtextil North America | Wearable Technology for First Responders

The WEAR Conference is the preeminent wearable technology, smart textiles, material innovation, and consumer experience conference. At the upcoming event to be held June 12-14 in San Francisco, Mark Mordecai, our Director of Business Development, will present the Globe Wearable Advanced Sensor Platform – WASP™ – the world’s only commercial physiological monitoring and location tracking system dedicated to serving the critical needs of public safety personnel. As project lead since inception, he will discuss the challenges and successes surrounding this effort and speak to the gaps that remain in order for it to achieve its full potential for users and to become a viable business. The leading cause of line of duty deaths for firefighters is cardiac events. Challenging environmental factors and a host of personal factors combine in complex ways, particularly during and after fire suppression, to trigger physiological responses that all too often lead to death or disability. And the biggest fear of firefighters is not fighting the fire; it’s being unable to locate and rescue a downed team member. The WASP™ system tracks heart rate, heart rate variability, estimated core body temperature, respiration rate, activity levels, posture, and other physiological factors, as well as 3D location inside a building. WEAR 2017 will specifically focus on the future of smart fabrics and wearable technology, with tours, workshops, and presentations about wearable apps, sustainability innovation, collaboration within the industry, fashion and technology, and the future of healthcare and connected medical devices. It is expected to draw over 300 attendees from adidas, IBM, Google, Lululemon, Nike, Amazon, and more. Mark is also scheduled to present the Globe WASP™ system...
Boston Fire Department’s Bunker Gear Particulate Testing

Boston Fire Department’s Bunker Gear Particulate Testing

By Edward McCarthy, Logistics Manager, Boston Fire Department The Boston Fire Department (BFD) has a long and proud history, one that we take great pride in. Boston has been at the forefront of the fire industry for well over 300 years. It was the first fire department in North America, tracing its lineage back to 1678. In 1851, the BFD was the first department in the world to protect the city through the use of a public telegraph fire alarm system, a system still in operation today. The BFD operated the first fire engine, a hand engine, put into service in 1678. It was one of the first to purchase a steam engine, one of the first with a fire boat, one of the first to use radio for communication. We pushed for, helped develop, and were the first department in the country to use modern breathing apparatus. While we are proud of our past, we must also be focused on the future, and we must always strive to continually improve. The Cancer Threat Recently the fire service, and Boston in particular, has been struggling with the reality of an ever-increasing number of firefighters being affected by cancer. While the reasons for this are hotly debated, the effect has been devastating. In Boston, 1 in 6 members will develop cancer and some will never recover. We have taken many steps to reduce exposure to toxic substances, increased physical fitness programs, shown members the benefits of healthy diets, and created a host of post incident decontamination processes. However, we felt that there was more that could be done. One area...
[Video] Globe Wearable Technology in SMARTER Research with Hanover Park Fire Department

[Video] Globe Wearable Technology in SMARTER Research with Hanover Park Fire Department

The ultimate goal of the SMARTER study (Science, Medicine, Research, Technology for Emergency Responders) going on now through most of 2018 is to reduce firefighter injuries and fatalities through the appropriate implementation of technology. Firefighters at the Hanover Park Fire Department in Illinois are wearing shirts designed by Globe that incorporate a physiologic status monitoring system developed by Zephyr. The firefighters wear the Globe shirts throughout their 24-hour shifts and physiologic data such as heart rate, estimated core body temperature, respiration rate, ECG, movement, and more are recorded via electronic modules that are snapped into the shirts. The data shows the impact of live field operations on their bodies. This research is being led by Skidmore College with collaborative support from University of California at Los Angeles, University of Illinois Fire Service Institute, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Fire Protection Research Foundation, National Fallen Firefighters Foundation, Hanover Park (Illinois) Fire Department, Globe Manufacturing Company, Zephyr Medtronic, International Association of Firefighters, and...